Management of trigger finger

Fact Checked

Trigger finger is a condition that develops when inflammation accumulates within a tendon of a finger and causes it to involuntarily flex. If serious, the affected finger is fixed in a flexed position and sometimes produces a snapping sound when forced to straighten.

People performing repetitive gripping face a high risk of developing trigger finger. Conditions such as arthritis and diabetes are more likely to develop trigger finger. Women with ages 40-60 are susceptible as well. The condition usually affects the thumb, middle finger and ring finger.

Symptoms of trigger finger

Trigger finger

A clicking sound can be heard when moving the finger

  • A clicking sound can be heard when moving the finger
  • A tender nodule can be felt at the base of the affected finger
  • Difficulty in making the affected finger straight

Treatment

  • Take plenty of rest, avoid performing repetitive gripping of the hand and flexing the thumb or forefinger.
  • Apply an ice pack on the affected finger for at least 10-15 minutes every hour until the swelling is lessened. Wrap the pack with a towel and apply on the affected tendon. The cold lessens the swelling and pain.
  • Compress the ice pack against the finger or hand using a bandage or elastic support to control the inflammation. Avoid wrapping it too tight to avoid disrupting the blood circulation in the area and worsen the condition.
  • Take the prescribed over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medications such as ibuprofen, naproxen or aspirin to lessen pain and inflammation of the affected finger.
  • Perform gentle stretching for the trigger finger.
  • In a bathtub filled with warm water, mix a cup of Epsom salt until it is totally dissolved and then soak the body including the hand for at least 10-15 minutes after stretching to lessen tension and pain.
  • Seek the help of the physical therapist for hand.
  • Wear a finger splint at night to prevent unnecessary movements and keep the finger in an extended position while sleeping. Splint the affected finger for at least 6 weeks. During the day, remove the splint to perform light stretches or gentle massages to prevent making the area stiff.
Was this post helpful?
Let us know if you liked the post. That’s the only way we can improve.
Yes0
No0

Tags:

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

The information posted on this page is for educational purposes only.
If you need medical advice or help with a diagnosis contact a medical professional

  • All cprhcp.ca content is reviewed by a medical professional and / sourced to ensure as much factual accuracy as possible.

  • We have strict sourcing guidelines and only link to reputable websites, academic research institutions and medical articles.

  • If you feel that any of our content is inaccurate, out-of-date, or otherwise questionable, please contact us through our contact us page.

  • All cprhcp.ca content is reviewed by a medical professional and / sourced to ensure as much factual accuracy as possible.

  • We have strict sourcing guidelines and only link to reputable websites, academic research institutions and medical articles.

  • If you feel that any of our content is inaccurate, out-of-date, or otherwise questionable, please contact us through our contact us page.